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June 2021: Five Facts About Fatherhood

June 20, 2021 marks not only the start of the summer season. It's also Father's Day, a special day to celebrate dear old dad. Here are five facts about fatherhood in honor of the occasion.

May 2021: Motherhood by the Numbers

 While mothers deserve appreciation every day of the year, Mother's Day offers a special opportunity to celebrate them. In honor of mothers everywhere, here are some facts about motherhood that might surprise you. 

April 2021: More People Delay Claiming Social Security

The average age for claiming Social Security retirement benefits has been steadily rising. Older Americans are working longer, in part because full retirement age is increasing incrementally from 66 to 67.

March 2021: Population Peaks

Global population is projected to peak at 9.7 billion in 2064 and decline to 8.8 billion by the end of the century, according to a study from the University of Washington Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. The reversal of population growth — already in progress in some countries — is due primarily to women's better access to education and contraception.

February 2021: Majority of Young Adults Living at Home

In 2020, a record number of 18- to 29-year-olds lived at home with their parents. In July, 52% of young adults were living at home, surpassing the previous high of 48% recorded in 1940 at the end of the Great Depression. This record return to the family home has been driven by the coronavirus pandemic and exacerbated by the overall economic downturn, record-low housing inventory along with a shortage of affordable entry-level homes and high levels of student debt. The number of young adults living with their parents grew across the board for all demographic groups and regions of the country.

January 2021: Impact of COVID-19 on Working Parents

The sudden shift to remote learning and stay-at-home orders imposed during the coronavirus pandemic forced many parents to juggle working at home with taking care of children and helping them with schoolwork. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, around one in five working-age adults (ages 18 to 64) with children said the reason they were not working was because COVID-19 had disrupted their child-care arrangements. Of those not working, women ages 25-44 were almost three times as likely as men to not be working due to child-care demands.

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